Job Seeker: How to Apply (or Not) Apply for a Job

Applying for a Job


It’s very easy as a job seeker to earn a reputation that you are not even aware of and is actively subverting your chances of getting a job. That reputation can take many forms, but there are a couple common types that stand out. One is of the person that applies to every job no matter if they’re qualified or not, and the other is the person who applies to jobs and then never returns calls or messages. Another common job seeker is the “always keeping my feelers out there” who is not quite committed to any job they are in. I think I can explain and address each candidate in this short article and provide some insight so you can avoid getting mislabeled.

Job Searching Online: 8 Best Practices You Need to Know | FlexJobs


Types of Job Seekers


Recruiters and HR managers who have been working in their market for over a year start to see the same candidates coming up in job board searches and as job applicants. When you are a candidate who applies to all jobs no matter what, this is not being perceived the way that you think it is, and will likely result in you being seen as an unserious job seeker. There is a pervasive idea that job descriptions are written as a list of “nice to have’s” instead of mandatory, and or can be negotiated during the interview process. So, you should apply even if you don’t have some of the so-called mandatory qualifications for the role. This method may have worked a couple times for some outliers in the industry, but it is not a recommended practice as it does harm your online reputation.

The other confusing tactic is applying for a job and then not responding to calls and messages about the job. In a way, as a recruiter, you are calling their bluff by saying “okay if you think you’re qualified, let’s have a conversation” and then that’s where the candidate ghosts you. In my career, I’ve always mentally red-flagged people that do that in case their name pops up again.

job search

There is also that unfortunate job seeker who is unaware that the Apply Now or Easy Apply button has the older version of your resume, which signals to anyone viewing it that you are bad at managing small details. This may or may not disqualify you right away, but we must avoid it right out of the gate.
Likewise, the candidate that is always keeping his “feelers out” is not somebody that a company wants to hire because their perception is “This guy will jump as soon as something pays him a little more.”

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job Application | WordStream
Linkedin Easy Apply


Start your Job Search


The absolute first step in the job search process is locking down your resume. Then you work on locking down your references and then doing a mock interview where you go through questions and responses.
Before you start your job search, make sure all your ducks are in a row. You are seeing a trend here with my advice over the past few articles which is, BE HONEST. Make it an honest and transparent job search. Don’t portray you or your skills as something they aren’t.

To message me directly, find me on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/joe-arrigo/

Join 30 other subscribers

Why Certain Personalities Should Start Their Own Business

Source: https://www.truity.com/

According to the book Type Talk At Work and the over 10,000 individuals the folks at OKA have interviewed over the last couple decades, over 60% of managers in corporate America are of the Thinking-Judging preference. As you climb the corporate ladder into the C-suite, this consolidates even further to about 90%. And of course this makes sense as you want to surround yourself with those who are most like you.

The issue with this is quite obvious. A whole ton of people aren’t of the T/J persuasion and fall into the Feeling-Perceiver preference. The major conflict comes with the J vs P function and the (J) manager’s inability to be flexible to the (P) employee’s agile work mindset and methodology. As a (J) Judger, deadlines are met, tasks are checked off in a linear manner, and projects plow full steam ahead with little room to change direction. And for the corporate leader, this is a very desirable trait to have. As a (P) Perceiver, flexibility is a must. There needs to be room to adjust schedules and deadlines as things come up as they are guaranteed to do. The ability to be successful comes down to having room to fly by the seat of our collective pants.

In addition, having a preference for (F) Feeling over (T) thinking will cause strife when it comes to conflict resolution and interpersonal communication. (F)’s make considerations based on the group and who it will effect. They want to make sure there is a consensus and that the group comes away harmonious after a decision is made. The (T) wants to take an objective stance and be pragmatic. What is best for the business, despite the feelings of the group? What makes the most sense? So, the conflict is awfully apparent and is one of the harder workplace conflicts to reconcile in the short term.

MBTI T vs. F. I'm an INFP but must be close to 50-50 because I ...

My advice to those who consistently find themselves in this predicament is to consider starting your own business. Or, at the very least, finding an outlet where you can put your own schedule, talent, and creativity to the test. Most recently, I have spoken to a number of F/P types who are starting an Etsy page to sell their art or pursuing other creative avenues where their flexibility won’t be challenged, their timelines can be in flux, and not everything comes down to what is most pragmatic.

There is no better time than now to start pushing for the things you want out of life. The first step is to know yourself. Once you do that, consider if you are utilizing your strengths to their absolute max, or if you are being held back.

To message me directly, find me on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/joe-arrigo/

Join 30 other subscribers

Job Search during COVID-19. Hiring, Firing and Furlough.

Nobody knows what is going on, and there is no strategy in place for both corporations and candidates alike.

Many candidates are getting furloughed, which I’m skeptical is actually a real word. What furloughed means is that you are still an employee but you don’t get all the perks of being employed, like getting paid. You might get to keep your health benefits, but that is usually it. This is much better than getting laid off, as the intent with being furloughed is to bring you back after a certain period of time. Its a huge cost-saving measure for the company, and they get to save face with their employee.

For those that were laid off, the market is purgatory. The image below is what it’s like to search for jobs on Indeed.

20 Creepy Pieces Of Purgatory Art
Welcome to the job market!

You don’t know if the job you applied for is truly hiring (heaven), or if it’s going to be “put on hold” indefinitely (hell). Likewise, the recruiter is talking to candidates as if the job is moving forward, with the nagging feeling that it could all be for naught. This is not a great location to reside.

The companies that are adapting quickly are going to to be the winners after we come out the other side of this. They are going to snatch up all the former on-site workers who have tasted the remote life, and take all the best talent across the US. Mentioned earlier, larger corporations are going to struggle with this transition. The small-to-medium size businesses will see the vision and thrive moving forward.

Economy and Corporations

The issue that big corporations have during this time is their inability to see past a small snapshot in time. Because the ultimate concept of the corporation is to deliver return to your shareholders, there is no flexibility when it comes to adjusting to a crisis like we have with COVID-19. There is no such thing as maintaining profits or holding steady — there most always be growth eternally. And with this mindset, its tough to be agile when its most needed. The instant reaction is to panic, slash spending and staff, and essentially hibernate until things blow over.

What I am not seeing at all while cruising around news blogs and LinkedIn, is a mention about the fragility of the economy. Imagine being a massive corporation with vaults full of money, huge dividends, and a positive cash-flow. A little 1-month slump can bring you to your knees? That’s not a strong economy built on a sound foundation. That’s a house made of sand that is praying the tide doesn’t rise too high.